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CPP : Cardiovascular Prevention and Pharmacotherapy

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Most-download articles are from the articles published in 2020 during the last three month.

Review Articles
Adverse effects of statin therapy and their treatment
Dae Young Cheon, Sang-Ho Jo
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2022;4(1):1-6.   Published online January 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2022.4.e4
  • 2,425 View
  • 145 Download
Abstract PDF
Statins are one of the most widely used drugs worldwide as first-line drugs for the treatment of hyperlipidemia and the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most of the side effects of statins are known to be mild, and mainly hepatotoxicity and various muscle symptoms are known. Recently, there have been studies on concerns about an increase in the incidence of diabetes after using statins, but it was found that the benefits sufficiently outweigh the risk of side effects. Therefore, the use of statins in the appropriate group should be actively performed, and it seems that the side effects can be prevented through close physical observation and appropriate examination.
Blood pressure control in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy
Helsi Rismiati, Hae-Young Lee
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2022;4(3):99-105.   Published online July 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2022.4.e16
  • 411 View
  • 22 Download
Abstract PDF
Hypertension is a major cause of maternal morbidity and occurs as a complication in up to one in ten pregnancies. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy encompass gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, chronic hypertension, and chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. However, the management of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy remains a matter of debate, particularly the blood pressure thresholds and targets for managing hypertension in pregnancy. Previously, there was no clear evidence of the effectiveness of aggressive blood pressure control in pregnancy due to the risk of fetal growth restriction. Recent clinical trials have shown that aggressive control of blood pressure in pregnant women is safe for both the mother and fetus. The purpose of this paper is to present a clinically oriented guide to the drugs of choice in patients with hypertension during pregnancy, present contrasts among different guidelines and recent clinical trials, and discuss the blood pressure thresholds and targets for hypertension during pregnancy based on recent studies.
Special Article
Update on the Pharmacotherapy of Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction
Eui-Soon Kim, Jong-Chan Youn, Sang Hong Baek
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2020;2(4):113-133.   Published online October 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2020.2.e17
  • 3,930 View
  • 48 Download
  • 8 Citations
Abstract PDF
Heart failure (HF) is an important cardiovascular disease because of the increasing prevalence, high morbidity and mortality, and rapid expansion of health care costs. Over the past decades, efforts have been made to modify the prognosis of patients with HF. Regarding HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), several drugs have shown to improve mortality and morbidity, based on large-scale randomized controlled trials, leading to a critical paradigm shift in its pharmacological treatment. The paradigm of HFrEF pathophysiology has shifted from cardiorenal disease to hemodynamic changes, and neurohormonal activation is currently considered the prime pathophysiological mechanism of HFrEF. This review summarizes evidence on the pharmacological management of HFrEF derived from major randomized controlled trials, which have accomplished improvements in survival benefits.
Original Article
Effect of the addition of thiazolidinedione to sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitor therapy on lipid levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a retrospective study using Korean National Health Insurance Service data
Taegyun Park, Kyungdo Han, Dongwook Shin, Jongho Park
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2022;4(3):114-122.   Published online July 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2022.4.e15
  • 385 View
  • 19 Download
Abstract PDF
Background
Dyslipidemia is common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and contributes to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have shown that treatment with thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2-i) may help to improve dyslipidemia in T2D patients. In this study, we investigated whether patients treated with TZD and SGLT2-i showed greater improvement in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels than those treated with only SGLT2-i.
Methods
From the National Health Insurance Service database of Korea, we extracted all patients who first received SGTL2-i from 2014 to 2016. Propensity score matching was performed to balance the two groups: group A (SGTL2-i and TZD, regardless of other antidiabetic medications) and group B (SGTL2-i only without TZD, regardless of other antidiabetic medications). Posttreatment HDL-C levels were compared by the Student t-test.
Results
In total, 1,400 T2D patients (700 in each group) were matched by propensity score matching. There was a significant posttreatment increase in HDL-C in group A (49.54±20.03 to 51.6±12.92 mg/dL, P=0.007), but not in group B (49.14±13.52 to 49.1±2.15 mg/dL, P=0.937). Group A also showed significantly higher posttreatment HDL-C levels than group B (51.4±12.92 vs. 49.1±12.15 mg/dL, P<0.001). Regarding the secondary endpoints, posttreatment triglyceride levels were lower (P<0.001), but total cholesterol (P=0.131) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (P=0.054) were not different after treatment.
Conclusions
The combination of SGTL2-i and TZD may be more effective in ameliorating dyslipidemia in T2D patients than SGLT2-i alone. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding.
Review Article
Perioperative Management of Hypertensive Patients
Helsi Rismiati, Hae-Young Lee
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2021;3(3):54-63.   Published online July 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2021.3.e7
  • 925 View
  • 79 Download
Abstract PDF
Due to the high prevalence of hypertension, hypertensive patients undergo perioperative evaluation and management. Severe hypertension may increase the operative risk. However, hypertension with a diastolic blood pressure of less than 110 mmHg usually does not appear to increase the risk. In general, it is recommended that oral antihypertensive drugs be continued before and after surgery. In particular, sympathetic blockers, such as beta-blockers, should be maintained. It is generally recommended to continue intake of calcium channel blockers, especially for surgeries with a low bleeding risk. However, in the case of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers, it is recommended that they be stopped 24 hours before surgery because they can inhibit excessive compensatory renin-angiotensin activation during surgery. Statin and aspirin medications are often prescribed for patients with hypertension. It is recommended to continue intake of statins in the perioperative period. Aspirins are recommended for low-risk patients undergoing noncardiac surgery.
Special Articles
Geriatric Considerations in the Management of Elderly Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases
Doo Soo Jeon
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2021;3(2):38-46.   Published online April 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2021.3.e6
  • 1,256 View
  • 24 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most frequently diagnosed disease as well as the leading cause of death in the elderly. It usually results from long-term effects of cardiovascular risk factors as well as the aging process itself. Elderly people commonly have geriatric syndrome, which is an age-specific problem that is complicated by the presence of cardiovascular, cognitive, and physical dysfunction and is accompanied by many other chronic diseases. While caring for the elderly, in addition to CVD, various inherent problems must be considered. The patient-centered approach, instead of evidence-based guidelines that are designed for young adult patients, is the most important concept when it comes to elderly patients with CVD and multiple comorbidities. This approach should be used to maintain the functionality, independence, quality of life, and dignity of these patients.
Tafamidis for Cardiac Transthyretin Amyloidosis
Darae Kim, Jin-Oh Choi, Eun-Seok Jeon
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2021;3(1):1-9.   Published online January 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2021.3.e1
  • 1,131 View
  • 23 Download
  • 1 Citations
Abstract PDF
Transthyretin amyloid (ATTR) cardiomyopathy is a progressive disease caused by the infiltration of ATTR fibrils in the myocardium. Although it is a rare disease, ATTR cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, and its incidence is increasing due to improved diagnostic imaging tools. There has been a breakthrough in the field of transthyretin amyloidosis, which opens a new therapeutic door for the patients. In this review, an overview of tafamidis therapy in ATTR cardiomyopathy with recent results from clinical trials will be discussed.
Competing Risk Model in Survival Analysis
Yena Jeon, Won Kee Lee
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2020;2(3):77-84.   Published online July 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2020.2.e11
  • 1,050 View
  • 48 Download
Abstract PDF
Survival analysis is primarily used to identify the time-to-event for events of interest. However, there subjects may undergo several outcomes; competing risks occur when other events may affect the incidence rate of the event of interest. In the presence of competing risks, traditional survival analysis such as the Kaplan-Meier method or the Cox proportional hazard regression introduces biases into the estimation of survival probability. In this review, we discuss several methods that can be used to consider competing risks in survival analysis: the cumulative incidence function, the cause-specific hazard function, and Fine and Gray's Subdistribution hazard function. We also provide a guide for conducting competing risk analysis using SAS with the bone marrow transplantation dataset presented by Klein and Moeschberger (1997).
Review Articles
Cardiovascular diseases in HIV patients
Hyun-Ha Chang
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2022;4(3):95-98.   Published online July 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2022.4.e14
  • 299 View
  • 8 Download
Abstract PDF
New and more effective antiretroviral therapy regimens have increased viral suppression and improved immune function recovery, leading to the extension of the lifespan of people living with HIV (PLWH). The extended lifespan of PLWH has recently been reported as a significant factor associated with diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, and long-term metabolic consequences, such as cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, this article briefly reviews the epidemiology and risk factors of cardiovascular diseases, including dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus, in PLWH.
Severe hypoglycemia as a risk factor for cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes: is it preventable?
Seung-Hyun Ko
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2022;4(3):106-113.   Published online July 29, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2022.4.e13
  • 501 View
  • 7 Download
Abstract PDF
Hypoglycemia in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is troublesome and an important barrier to diabetes management. Although more intensive glycemic control is emphasized to prevent diabetes-related long-term complications, it raises the risk of hypoglycemia in people with T2DM. Severe hypoglycemia (SH), defined as critical events characterized by altered mental and/or physical status requiring assistance for recovery, is considered an advanced and life-threatening form of hypoglycemia. The detection of SH is an important issue because it is associated with further adverse clinical outcomes such as cardiovascular events, mortality, cognitive impairment, and decreased quality of life. By identifying the potential risk factors for SH and introducing measures to minimize SH, SH itself and subsequent harmful clinical outcomes could be prevented in people with T2DM. The traditional risk factors for SH in T2DM, such as older age, long-standing diabetes with decreased insulin secretion, advanced vascular complications, serious comorbidities, and insulin use, are usually unmodifiable. However, unhealthy lifestyle factors, defined as current smoking, heavy alcohol consumption, and lack of regular exercise, can be improved through active patient education. In recent research, greater adherence to healthy lifestyle factors and any improvement in unhealthy lifestyle habits were found to be associated with a substantially lower risk of SH in individuals with T2DM. As well as being an essential component of diabetes self-care and optimal glycemic control, lifestyle modification probably contributes to the prevention of SH in individuals with T2DM.
De-escalation strategies of dual antiplatelet therapy in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for acute coronary syndrome
Young Bin Song
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2022;4(2):63-69.   Published online April 26, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2022.4.e11
  • 1,008 View
  • 26 Download
Abstract PDF
Antiplatelet therapy is important for reducing systemic and local thrombotic events in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Antiplatelet treatment regimens, along with dual antiplatelet therapy consisting of aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor for patients receiving PCI, have frequently changed over the years. With improvements in the understanding of the prognostic relevance of bleeding events in patients with PCI, as well as the safety and efficacy of drug-eluting stents, several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been conducted on antiplatelet treatment strategies associated with a more favorable balance between ischemic and bleeding risks. Several key RCTs for appropriate antiplatelet therapy in patients receiving PCI for ACS have been reported, and practical guidelines have been updated. This manuscript presents the results of major RCTs on de-escalation strategies of dual antiplatelet treatment in patients receiving PCI for ACS.
Antiplatelet Therapy for Secondary Stroke Prevention in Patients with Ischemic Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack
Kyung-Yul Lee
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2021;3(4):86-94.   Published online October 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2021.3.e10
  • 1,331 View
  • 37 Download
Abstract PDF
The risk of stroke recurrence is highest in the acute phase after transient ischemic attack (TIA) or ischemic stroke. Therefore, patients with TIA or ischemic stroke should be treated with antiplatelet medication for stroke prevention. The short-term use of dual antiplatelet therapy between 21 and 90 days may be considered in those with acute minor stroke or TIA and highrisk of recurrence. However, the long-term use of dual antiplatelet therapy is not recommended due to the risk of bleeding. The current stroke guideline does not specify the administration of an antiplatelet for the secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. However, as clinical studies progress, antiplatelet therapy may become a personalized treatment in the future.
Special Article
Improving Causal Inference in Observational Studies: Interrupted Time Series Design
Kyoung-Nam Kim
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2020;2(1):18-23.   Published online January 31, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2020.2.e2
  • 678 View
  • 18 Download
Abstract PDF
Interrupted time series analysis is often used to evaluate the effects of healthcare policies and interventional projects using observational data. Interrupted time series analysis is one of the epidemiological methods, which are based on the assumption that the trend of the pre-intervention time series, if not intervened, would have the same tendency in the post-intervention period. Time series during the pre-intervention period are used to model a counterfactual situation without intervention during the post-intervention period. The effects of intervention can be seen in the form of abrupt changes in the result level (intercept) due to the intervention and/or changes in the result over time (slope) after the intervention. If the effects of intervention are predefined, the effects of the intervention can be distinguished and analyzed based on the time series analysis model constructed accordingly. Interrupted time series analysis is generally performed in a pre-post comparison using the intervention series. Recently, however, controlled interrupted time series analysis, which uses a control series as well as an intervention series, has also been used. The controlled interrupted time series analysis uses a control series to control potential confounding due to events occurring concurrently with the intervention of interest. Even though interrupted time series analysis is a useful way to assess the effects of intervention using observational data, misleading results can be derived if the conditions for proper application are not met. Before applying the method, it is necessary to make sure that the data conforms to the conditions for proper application.
Original Article
Association between reproductive aging and hypertension among Korean women
Eunji Kim, Youngrong Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2022;4(1):34-41.   Published online January 19, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2022.4.e2
  • 906 View
  • 24 Download
Abstract PDFSupplementary Material
Background
Although postmenopausal women are well known to have a high prevalence of hypertension, it is unclear whether menopause itself increases blood pressure independently from the known risk factors of hypertension. This study sought to determine whether an association exists between reproductive aging, analyzed as a gradual transition, and an increased risk of hypertension among Korean women.
Methods
This cross-sectional study used baseline data from 5,456 women aged 30 to 64 years who participated in the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Etiology Research Center study in Korea from 2013 to 2018. The participants’ stage of reproductive aging was assessed by a questionnaire and categorized as premenopause, perimenopause, and postmenopause. Multiple logistic regression models were used to analyze the association between menopausal status and hypertension after adjusting for age, education level, marital status, employment, household income, smoking, drinking, physical activity, body mass index, and hormone replacement therapy use.
Results
The prevalence of hypertension increased with reproductive aging: 9.8% in premenopause, 25.2% in perimenopause, and 27.7% in postmenopause. The adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for having hypertension was 1.70 (1.07–2.72) for perimenopausal women and 1.14 (0.88–1.48) for postmenopausal women, compared to premenopausal women.
Conclusions
Our study shows that perimenopausal women are at high risk of developing hypertension. Since the menopausal transition may last months or years, blood pressure monitoring and early interventions are crucial for not only postmenopausal women, but also those in the transition.
Review Article
Body Weight Change and Cardiovascular Disease: Effect of Weight Gain, Weight Loss, and Weight Cycling
Jung-Hwan Cho, Eun-Jung Rhee, Won-Young Lee
Cardiovasc Prev Pharmacother. 2021;3(4):73-81.   Published online October 31, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.36011/cpp.2021.3.e12
  • 1,445 View
  • 55 Download
Abstract PDF
Obesity is an independent risk factor for the development and progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Various cardiovascular outcomes are related to the association between body weight change and CVD. Metabolically healthy obese individuals could have a better prognosis in terms of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than metabolically unhealthy obese individuals. Smoking cessation causes significant weight gain and consequent deterioration of the metabolic profile despite not impairing the cardiovascular benefits. Intentional weight loss has a consistent cardiovascular protective effect, but unintentional weight loss due to progressive catabolism and loss of muscle mass could be associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes. Obese individuals who are successful in losing weight with subsequent regain (weight cycling) could have an unfavorable cardiometabolic profile and the risk of CVD. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of weight changes on CVD by identifying unknown pathophysiology and to decide appropriate management and interventions for various phenotypes of weight change.

CPP : Cardiovascular Prevention and Pharmacotherapy